moments from the week

Lijah in tiger face paint roaring while holding a lollipop

tigers like the orange lollipops

Moments from the past week.

Lijah up high in a tree, with a ladder below him

up a tree

Lijah in lion sweatshirt making lemondade

a study in yellow

the boys playing a board game

sometimes it rains

the boys eating ice cream in a crowded church hall

strawberry fest (with ice cream)

Harvey lying in the grass reading a book

always reading

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ready to roll tomorrow

Tomorrow is the PMC Kids Ride. The boys are super excited; or they were, until I took them out to ride the course this afternoon. Now they're tired and aren't sure they can do it again. You might think it wasn't wise to wear them out less than 24 hours before the big ride, but I figure kids recover quickly—and knowing the route will be more helpful than totally fresh legs. The hardest thing about a long ride is not knowing how long it's going to be, and having landmarks to look out for will make it feel that much easier. So will having friends to ride with, as part of a big crowd. They'll do great. And then when we get to the middle school there'll be a big party, which wasn't the case today.

Harvey and Zion with their bikes in the empty middle school parking lot

Zion saying "I'm dead"

You see that they're already wearing their shirts. We picked them up yesterday evening, along with the other swag and our raffle tickets. I was hoping, as we visited the early registration, to have some acknowledgement of our fantastic fundraising effort this year—a cool $500 (thanks so much to everyone who donated!)—but the volunteer at the table didn't make any mention of it. Unlike last year when we got rolls of tickets for our paltry $365. Was it a mistake last year? Or have standards gone up? Anyways, I was proud of what our friends and family members contributed towards cancer research and treatment, and proud of the boys for their pre-ride today... and I'm ready to be proud of them again tomorrow!

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garden update

As always, gardening this year has had its frustrations. The boys and I went to both the local nurseries today looking for butternut squash seedlings to replace ours, nine out of ten of which were eaten within a couple days of sprouting. Also nearly all the kale was nibbled in the same time span, which was pretty discouraging. Clearly we need better fences. Fences at all, actually; right now there are giant gaps where I took down wire or even posts in order to improve the construction. With my dilettante sort of farming it's tough to plant and weed and make infrastructure improvements, so I guess this year the priority is the latter. Besides the fence I also finally upgraded the raked raised beds with actual wooden sides. I was doing that while I was also trying to get plants and seeds in, which wasn't optimal... but next spring they'll there all ready to go! And this year, even with all that, we're still getting lots of good things.

Zion holding a bowl of strawberries in the garden

the first this year

Those were the first strawberries, which Zion and Lijah picked yesterday. (You see they're not in an enclosed raised bed yet, since they were already growing. But this should be their last year in that spot, so we'll move them to one for next year.) The peas, well-protected with their own private fence, are also doing well, and so's the arugula and mixed greens. Tomatoes are looking strong. We ate all the asparagus we wanted, and lots of green onions. The garlic looks like it'll be the biggest ever, and none too soon: last year's crop is almost gone. And, while we failed to find any butternut squash plants, we picked up a bunch of pickling cucumbers instead. The boys like pickles better than squash anyways.

the garden beds

the beds back in May

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Anna Hibiscus

We like lots of books. There are now four readers in our house, and together we plow through a lot of written material. But obviously, some books are more favorite than others. As Zion is working his way though short chapter books, we've rediscovered some old favorites. Just like Harvey, he enjoyed Dory Fantasmagory, and read all four. We also rediscovered another series we've enjoyed, Anna Hibiscus—and even better, we found that there are now twice as many books in the series than last time we looked!

In the US it's hard to find books about other cultures that aren't completely othering—like, "look at how people live in other places!" So we really appreciate the exceptions. Anna Hibiscus is a girl living with her big family in Lagos, Nigeria. Her dad is Nigerian and her mom is originally from Canada, so while she—and her mom—feel completely Nigerian, she also has a little bit of a different perspective about her family and her city than her many cousins (the books' author, Atinuke, is similarly a child of mixed cultures). That gives the non-Nigerian reader a great perspective on life in Lagos or the village. Even better, in the third book Anna Hibiscus travels by herself to Canada to visit her grandmother, giving American readers a rare look at North American culture as strange and other!

Besides that, the books are wonderful in lots of other ways. The communal life Anna Hibiscus and her extended family share sounds amazing and overwhelming. Anna's unique perspective sometimes clashes with her family's traditional values, and both sides end up learning something. And Anna Hibiscus's kindness should be an example to everyone. As of now there are eight chapter books and a couple of picture books in the series... you should read all of them.

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moments from the week

Harvey running though a spray of water

summer evening

Moments from the past week.

Lijah dripping on the porch

on a break from playing in the rain

Zion planting petunias in a flower box

beautifying

geese and goslings walking right by the boys on the beach

Walden geese are used to people

Zion playing with kids outside at the Discovery Museum

kids to play with

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